Thursday, August 21, 2014

The CIA's Cold War allies included the Zionists of Israel and the USSR by Wayne Madsen




The CIA's Cold War allies included the Zionists of Israel and the USSR

Declassified Central Intelligence Agency files spanning some five years in the 1950s point to Zionist organizations inside the Soviet Union as embedded agents for Western intelligence.

An undated formerly CONFIDENTIAL CIA memorandum from "Assistant Director, Special Operations" to "Assistant Director, Reports and Estimates" provides information on "Hashomer Hatzair." The group is described as an "international Zionist radical-socialist political party." The memo further states, "In January 1948 the Palestine or central branch of the party joined with the Palestine branch of Abdut Avodah (United Labor Zionist Party) to form MAPAM."  Hashomer Hatzair translates to English as "Young Guard."

The memo, which appears to have been written in the early 1950s, points out that in the January 1949 elections, MAPAM polled 14.8% of the vote, making it the second largest party in Israel.

Hashomer Hatzai pushed for collectivized farms, also known as kibbutzes, in Palestine as early as 1914, the same year that saw the beginning of World War I. What the CIA documents reveal calls into question the widely-believed notion of "leftist" or "liberal" Zionism. The existence of leftist Zionism is a claim often made by Zionism's supporters to offset the argument that global Zionism is, in reality, a worldwide fascist movement.


Hashomer Hatzair, used by CIA as an intelligence network, has co-opted the fleur-de-lis symbol for the World Scouting Movement. The Zionist movement continues to claim socialist and Marxist credentials.

It is clear that the CIA saw Hashomer Hatzair as a potentially advantageous Trojan horse deep within the Soviet bloc, called the "orbit" by the CIA, that could be relied upon to provide intelligence to the West.

The CIA document states that Hashomer Hatzair, which maintained an office at 305 Broadway in New York, adopted a stance opposed to the "anti-Zionist" policies of the Soviet bloc. The leading critics of the USSR's anti-Zionist policies are listed as the top Hashomer Hatzair/MAPAM leaders: Meir Yaari, Jcob Hazan, and Mordechai Bentov.

A subsequent CIA document, formerly classified "TOP SECRET Security Information," suggests that Bulgaria, with the smallest Jewish population of the "orbit" nations, was the country that maintained the closest relations with Israel. The Top Secret document states that Zionists in the Soviet orbit maintained "Western contacts" and that one Soviet Jewish leader, Solomon Mikhoels [aka Milchoels] had contacts with the early CIA station in Moscow "outside inpost," meaning that Mikhoels's contacts with the CIA were restricted to U.S. intelligence agents outside of the actual CIA station at the U.S. embassy in Moscow.

Mikhoels, the director of the Moscow State Jewish Theater, was arrested by Soviet security police in 1948 on the orders of Soviet leader Joseph Stalin. Mikhoels's body was later dumped on a road outside of Minsk. Soviet authorities claimed Mikhoels was killed in a hit-and-run accident. However, based on the CIA document's revelations about Mikhoels's contacts with the U.S. embassy, the Soviet Jewish director and one-time actor was probably identified as a spy for the West.

The CIA document states "Mikhoels, a prominent Jewish leader who maintained contact with the West," died in 1948, the same year in which the Israeli legation was established in Moscow. There is also a clear indication by the CIA that Mikhoels maintained unauthorized contact with Israeli "diplomats" in Moscow. No sooner had Israel established a legation in Moscow in 1948, the Soviets discovered intelligence links between Israeli diplomats and Soviet Jews.


Solomon Mikhoels [far right], a darling of Soviet and Russian Zionists, was, in fact, a Western intelligence operative as revealed by CIA documents. Pictured above in the U.S. with Soviet Yiddish poet Itzik Feffer [left] and Albert Einstein [center] in 1943. Both Mikhoels and Feffer fell victim to Stalin's secret police, however, it is noteworthy that their cause has been taken up by leftist-turned-rightist neoconservative David Horowitz, proving the chameleon-like qualities of Zionists like Horowitz who easily change from left-wing to neocon and right-wing.


The CIA saw a great opportunity to create problems inside the Soviet Union. The formerly Top Secret CIA document states: 
"Concern over the fate of Jews in Orbit may lead to attempt to establish underground movement in Orbit." In fact, such an underground was established in the 1960s, 70s, and 80s by Soviet Jews like Anatoly Scharansky (now Natan Sharansky), a leading right-wing political leader in Israel today and a proponent of increased Israeli colonization of the West Bank with settlements.

Although the USSR was one of the first countries to support the creation of Israel, the CIA believed it was a way for Moscow to decolonize the Middle East. The CIA document clearly links Western and Israeli intelligence to Soviet Jews. The obvious links led to repeated expulsions of suspected Israeli spies from the Israeli embassy in Moscow.

The CIA flatly concluded that the Soviet actions were the result of "anti-Semitism," a canard still used today to describe opponents of Israeli activities.

The CIA file on Western and Israeli links with Soviet orbit Zionists, include a Soviet "New Times" article, dated January 21, 1953, that states the CIA's European Division director, an officer with the last name of Schwartz, was the main link between a "Joint Zionist Organization" in the United States and leading Soviet bloc Zionists. Schwartz was identified as having worked with a "Joint Zionist Organization" director in Budapest named "I. Jakobson," who was later expelled from Hungary for "spying and subversive activities." The Joint Zionist Organization described in the Soviet article matches up with the Hashomer Hatzair organization in New York, with which the CIA maintained links.

The Soviets had a healthy dose of distrust for Russian Zionists since the 1917 Russian Revolution. The Soviet article states, "all the Russian Zionist leaders who fled the country after the October Revolution -- Ruthenberg (a personel friend and close collaborator of Kerensky), Neidich, Margolin, Jaffe, etc -- entered the services of the [British] Foreign Office and the Intelligence Service."

The Soviet tract also describes how the deposed "Slansky gang" in Czechoslovakia was found to have been working with two former Israeli Ministers in Prague -- "Avriel (√úberall) and Kubovy" to commit acts of espionage and sabotage for the CIA.

Rudolf Slansky, who was Jewish, was the General Secretary of the Czechoslovak Communist Party. In 1951, he and his loyalists, were charged with being "Titoist" followers of the Yugoslav Communist leader Josip Broz Tito and working for Western intelligence. In 1968, during the Prague Spring, Slansky was rehabilitated. In 1989, Czech President Vaclav Havel, who also permitted global hedge fund mogul George Soros to establish various non-governmental organizations in Prague and permitted Radio Free Europe to open a major office in the Czech capital, named Slansky's son, Rudolf Slansky, Jr., as the Czech ambassador to Moscow.